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Managing people, human capital and culture - Human Resource Management (HRM) is critical for business success. HRM Guide publishes articles and news releases about HR surveys, employment law, human resource research, HR books and careers that bridge the gap between theory and practice.

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PHR/SPHR

PHR/SPHR: Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide

by Sandra M Reed and Anne M. Bogardus
The Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) exams from the Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) reflect the evolving industry standards for determining competence in the field of HR. Serving as an ideal resource for HR professionals who are seeking to validate their skills and knowledge.
This new edition is must-have preparation for those looking to take the PHR or SPHR certification exams in order to strengthen their resume.
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PHR Study Guide 2017

PHR Study Guide 2017: PHR Certification Test Prep and Practice Questions for the Professional in Human Resources Exam

Think all PHRŪ/SPHRŪ study guides are the same? Think again! With easy to understand lessons and practice test questions designed to maximize your score, you'll be ready.
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The Future of Human Resource Management

The Future of Human Resource Management: 64 Thought Leaders Explore the Critical HR Issues of Today and Tomorrow

Edited by Mike Losey, Dave Ulrich, Sue Meisinger
  The follow-up to the bestselling Tomorrow's HR Management, this book presents an international panel of expert contributors who offer their views on the state of HR and what to expect in the future. Topics covered include HR as a decision science, understanding and managing people, creating and adapting organizational culture, the effects of globalization, collaborative ventures, and investing in the next generation. Like its bestselling predecessor before it, The Future of Human Resource Management offers the very best thinking on the future of HR from the most respected leaders in the field.
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Overtime Pay Regulations

ALEXANDRIA, Va., July 3 2003 /U.S. Newswire/ - The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) today said the Department of Labor's efforts to update the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) will clarify the extremely complicated regulations, and also open the door for nearly 1.3 million more American workers to receive overtime pay.

Following a 90-day comment period ending June 30, the DOL is reviewing comments regarding its proposed changes to the white-collar exemption rules, Section 541 of the FLSA, which will affect every U.S. employer. The regulations governing exempt and non-exempt employees are more than a half-century old and no longer apply to many jobs in the workforce, making them vague and extremely difficult for human resource (HR) professionals to comply. For the last 12 years, the definition of an exempt employee under FLSA has been the number one question SHRM receives from its members, with over 8,000 calls on the issue in 2002 alone.

"More than one million American workers could be eligible for overtime pay but are not currently because regulations have not kept pace with the changing workforce," said SHRM President and CEO Sue Meisinger, SPHR. "The changes proposed by the DOL will mean more money in the pockets of low-level employees who are currently salaried and not receiving overtime pay. It's unfortunate that unfounded fears around this issue and potential congressional action could jeopardize a long overdue update to these regulations."

The 65 year-old law, which hasn't been updated in decades, is out of touch with workers and a workplace that bear little resemblance to that of the post-depression era. Employers struggle to apply regulations that describe jobs and duties that no longer exist. Not surprisingly, this has led to an increase in FLSA lawsuits, the most rapidly growing area of employment class-action litigation.

"The jobs and responsibilities of today's workers don't fit into the neat little boxes envisioned by the Depression-era drafters of the FLSA," Meisinger added. "Consequently, HR professionals, who are responsible for interpreting the confusing, ambiguous regulations, must try to apply them in an equitable manner. The proposed changes would streamline the criteria used for determining exempt/non-exempt status by utilizing an objective test that takes both the salary and the job duties into account."

Given the rapid changes in the workplace and workforce, and the complex and confusing nature of the FLSA, the Society has long pushed for necessary and reasonable revisions.


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