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Managing people, human capital and culture - Human Resource Management (HRM) is critical for business success. HRM Guide publishes articles and news releases about HR surveys, employment law, human resource research, HR books and careers that bridge the gap between theory and practice.

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PHR/SPHR

PHR/SPHR: Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide

by Sandra M Reed and Anne M. Bogardus
The Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) exams from the Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) reflect the evolving industry standards for determining competence in the field of HR. Serving as an ideal resource for HR professionals who are seeking to validate their skills and knowledge.
This new edition is must-have preparation for those looking to take the PHR or SPHR certification exams in order to strengthen their resume.
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PHR Study Guide 2017

PHR Study Guide 2017: PHR Certification Test Prep and Practice Questions for the Professional in Human Resources Exam

Think all PHRŪ/SPHRŪ study guides are the same? Think again! With easy to understand lessons and practice test questions designed to maximize your score, you'll be ready.
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The Future of Human Resource Management

The Future of Human Resource Management: 64 Thought Leaders Explore the Critical HR Issues of Today and Tomorrow

Edited by Mike Losey, Dave Ulrich, Sue Meisinger
  The follow-up to the bestselling Tomorrow's HR Management, this book presents an international panel of expert contributors who offer their views on the state of HR and what to expect in the future. Topics covered include HR as a decision science, understanding and managing people, creating and adapting organizational culture, the effects of globalization, collaborative ventures, and investing in the next generation. Like its bestselling predecessor before it, The Future of Human Resource Management offers the very best thinking on the future of HR from the most respected leaders in the field.
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Is it racism or something else?

April 25 2003 - Are you looking for a white-collar technical job on the web? If so, you should make sure your name sounds Japanese, Jewish or "white." That will increase the likelihood of an interview by a factor of seven to eight times compared to your chances if your name sounds African-American, Greek, Hispanic or Italian, according to a recent CNW survey.

And if you are searching for a white-collar position at a Fortune 500 company a Japanese, Jewish or Irish surname is three times as effective in landing an interview as a surname which sound African-American, Italian, Greek or Hispanic.

But favoritism also works in other ways. People with African-American or Irish sounding names seeking work at one of the top 25 Black Enterprise companies are more likely to get an interview call than Greek, Hispanic or Jewish applicants. Want to apply for one of the top 25 Hispanic businesses in the U.S.? Hispanic, Irish and Italians are more likely to land an interview than others.

A similar pattern was observed when job searches were for blue-collar positions.

What about newspapers looking for entry level reporters? It's best to be Jewish, Irish or African-American. Your odds are two to three times better of getting an interview than if your name is "white" and 10 times better than if it's Greek.

"While there is likely some racism involved, a large component may be one of association," says Art Spinella, CNW President. "NASCAR drivers typically don't hang out with kayakers and NBA players aren't seen clubbing with Little People. Is it racism or a comfort level with people presumed to have similar job and social experiences?"

The survey was conducted between October 2002 and January 2003. 8,500 applications and/or resumes were sent to more than 150 companies.


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