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Managing people, human capital and culture - Human Resource Management (HRM) is critical for business success. HRM Guide publishes articles and news releases about HR surveys, employment law, human resource research, HR books and careers that bridge the gap between theory and practice.

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PHR/SPHR

PHR/SPHR: Professional in Human Resources Certification Study Guide

by Sandra M Reed and Anne M. Bogardus
The Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) exams from the Human Resources Certification Institute (HRCI) reflect the evolving industry standards for determining competence in the field of HR. Serving as an ideal resource for HR professionals who are seeking to validate their skills and knowledge.
This new edition is must-have preparation for those looking to take the PHR or SPHR certification exams in order to strengthen their resume.
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PHR Study Guide 2017

PHR Study Guide 2017: PHR Certification Test Prep and Practice Questions for the Professional in Human Resources Exam

Think all PHRŪ/SPHRŪ study guides are the same? Think again! With easy to understand lessons and practice test questions designed to maximize your score, you'll be ready.
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Corporate Communication

Corporate Communication: A Guide to Theory and Practice

by Joep P. Cornelissen
  Academically grounded, it covers the key concepts, principles and models within corporate communication by bringing together academic knowledge and insights from the subject areas of management and communication
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What Recruiters Want

August 20 2010 - A recent study from leading North American recruitment firm Rosenzweig & Company highlights how potential employees can best respond to increased use of recruiters as the economy recovers.

Jay Rosenzweig, managing partner said:

"It's been a long while since many people have been in these interviewing situations making it even more important than ever to have a firm grasp of the process well before the interview begins."

The report offers key advice for individuals recruited for a job opportunity:

  • The headhunter works for the employer, but can also be your friend - The report points out that recruiters can provide general advice and be used as a sounding board. The recruiter can act as an intermediary between candidates and potential employers, responding to comments or concerns before direct contact takes place.
  • Retainer v. contingency - Clarify the basis on which recruiters are being employed. Retainer-based contracts where payment is assured tend to be less focused on quick results and commission, reducing the risk of inappropriate placements.
  • Sell yourself - Convey your skills, experience and career plans without overstating your accomplishments. Provide recruiters with sufficient information to promote your candidacy to a potential employer.
  • Be yourself - Recruiters and potential employers can detect insincerity. Trying to redefine your background or personality in an attempt to fit a specific role is unlikely to be successful.
  • Do your homework - Research your prospective employers including recent financial and operational developments. However, do not present yourself as an expert on the organization.
  • Try to relax - Attempting to anticipate questions and preparing answers is likely to be counter-productive. Candidates may be unsuccessful if over-eagerness is interpreted as desperation.
  • Be honest about any other opportunities you are considering - Both recruiters and potential employers will understand that you may be considering other options but will not appreciate being misled.
  • Come clean - Be honest with the recruiter about any past issues that could affect the attitude of a prospective employer. It is better to volunteer potentially negative information than risk it emerging at a later date.
  • Accept constructive criticism - If recruiters or potential employers provide constructive criticism, use it as a learning opportunity.

Jay Rosenzweig commented:

"Job seekers have had lean years and very little movement on the jobs front, including at the higher levels. Some people who've survived the recession with their job intact may think they hold all the cards if a company or recruiter calls. But now, more than ever, the best advice is to check your ego at the door and understand the 'buy and sell' process when presented with dream job opportunities. One of the most fundamental rules in this business is to know when to talk and know when to listen."


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